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Man has always looked up at the night sky and wondered ...

What is all that? Why is it there? Where does it go? Who lives out there? Are they like us?

The questions go on as far as the universe ... but what are the answers? Today we know much more than the first men. But, there are many answers we still don't have. In fact, we probably have more questions than before.

But, as with everything else, the more closely we look, the better we understand. With Astronomy, to look closer, you must look farther. Technology has allowed us to do just that. In fact, just about anyone today can easily obtain (or build) a much better telescope than did Galileo ... considered the father of modern Astronomy.

Astronomy is a fascinating hobby. You can start easily with a few books. Star charts or planetarium software will quickly familiarize you with the major objects to be found in the night sky. Actually, the objects are there in the daytime, too ... you just can't see them, because of the strong light from the sun. In a few nights you'll be surprised how many objects you remember. With simply a pair of binoculars, new and exciting finds will pop into your view. With a small, inexpensive telescope, combined with a camera you probably already own, incredible views will begin to fill your scrapbook. How deeply you delve into the universe around us will be limited only by your time and energy.

The skills you learn while pursuing the sky's beauty will also come in handy while you're hiking or boating. Knowing your way around the sky will help you also know your way around the earth.

More Links to Astronomy

 


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Pages Last Updated on March 11, 2015

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